Monday, June 30, 2014

Cedar Waxwings descend on Three Sisters

I have been observing a pretty cool summer treat . On Three Sisters Islands most evenings the past week and even today diurnally, a trove of CEDAR WAXWINGS  are making Three Sisters Islands their playpen. Fluttering and flying from tree to tree, the waxwings are providing some summery entertainment.

Check it out.

http://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/cedar_waxwing/id

Boreal Bird habitat

I never got around to posting this back in May. I received this as an emailing from Boreal Canada Birds

http://borealbirds.org/announcements/boreal-birds-need-half-maintaining-north-americas-bird-nursery-and-why-it-matters


Hi Peter,
Thought you might be interested in our “Boreal Birds Need Half Report” released today and summarized below. We would love your help in letting other know about it through your website, blogs, Facebook, etc.
 Jeff
Jeff Wells, Ph.D.
Science and Policy Director, Boreal Songbird Initiative

 One of the world’s greatest migrations is happening now.  Billions of migratory birds are heading from the U.S., Central and South America to what’s been dubbed “North America’s bird nursery” —the sprawling billion-plus-acre boreal forest that spans the continent from Alaska across Canada to Newfoundland and Labrador—to nest and produce next year’s generation of birds.
 However, as abundant as they are, boreal birds face myriad challenges and threats to their habitat. Some of the most iconic species have suffered dramatic declines in recent decades.
 A new science report - Boreal Birds Need Half: Maintaining North America’s Bird Nursery and Why it Matters - released May 5 , recommends protecting at least 50 percent of the boreal forest from industrial development. That level of conservation is vital to provide birds the best chance of maintaining healthy populations for hundreds of species of birds that rely on the boreal forest for nesting and migratory stopover.. 
 The report, produced by Ducks Unlimited and the Boreal Songbird Initiative, offers scientific support for expansive, landscape-scale habitat conservation in large, interconnected protected areas that are necessary to help ensure the diversity of species . It also showcases significant areas across Canada where birds, landscapes and biodiversity are extraordinarily special.
 The report also reveals often unappreciated roles boreal birds play in providing ecosystem services—pollinating plants, redistributing nutrients, and controlling pests, for example—and the value they add (more than $100 billion to economies in the U.S. and Canada). It also emphasizes the integral role birds play in the culture of Aboriginal Peoples throughout the boreal. 







Jeff Wells
Senior Scientist, International Boreal Conservation Campaign
Science and Policy Director, Boreal Songbird Initiative


Sunday, June 29, 2014

prospect lake 6/29

Sunday, June 29, 2014

Evewatch Prospect Lake: Skimmer party

A total of eleven BLACK SKIMMERS visited Prospect Lake tonight.Two
seperate flocks, the first comprised of 8 birds flew in like ghosts
from the west island corner, stayed only 30 seconds gliding at the
northwest corner before taking off higher over the picnic tables.

But it wasn't long before another, but smaller flock of 3 Skimmers
flew in from the same section. This flock stuck around though, but far
from my bins view ,staying close by Duck Island, as darkness descended.
The first flock came in 8:45.

A lone RUDDY DUCK (4 Friday eve), & single BLACK CROWNED NIGHT HERON
were other notables.

Exiting the park near Greenwood Ave, I saw my first fireflies, about a
dozen lighting up the night :-)

-KB
Posted by Kingsboider at 11:25 PM

Evewatch Prospect Lake: Skimmer party

A total of eleven BLACK SKIMMERS visited Prospect Lake tonight.Two seperate flocks, the first comprised of 8 birds flew in like ghosts from the west island corner, stayed only 30 seconds gliding at the northwest corner before taking off higher over the picnic tables.

But it wasn't long before another, but smaller flock of  3 Skimmers flew in from the same section. This flock stuck around though, but far from my bins view ,staying close by Duck Island, as darkness descended. The first flock came in 8:45.

A lone RUDDY DUCK (4 Friday eve), & single BLACK CROWNED NIGHT HERON were other notables.

Exiting the park near Greenwood Ave, I saw my first fireflies, about  a dozen lighting up the night :-)

-KB

Saturday, June 28, 2014

Yellow warbler today

From Marvin Baptiste




Why we should buy the Duck Stamp

The new one is on sale , effective July 1st

http://blog.aba.org/2014/06/open-mic-the-case-for-the-duck-stamp.html

From US Postal

https://store.usps.com/store/browse/productDetailSingleSku.jsp?categoryNav=false&navAction=push&navCount=0&productId=S_335104&categoryId=buy-stamps

Fwd: ABC's Bird of the Week: Chuck-will's-widow

For me,the bird of the spring bird club season was " Chuckie. "...see the ABC birds email about this species...



-----Original Message-----
From: info@abcbirds.org
To: prosbird
Sent: Fri, Jun 27, 2014 3:03 pm
Subject: ABC's Bird of the Week: Chuck-will's-widow

Milker of Goats?
botwheader.jpg
 

Nocturnal Name-caller:
Chuck-will's-widow

Chuck-will's-widow belongs to a family of birds with the folk name "goatsuckers." The family name, Caprimulgidae, literally means "milker of goats" and is based on an ancient belief that the birds milked goats with their enormous mouths each night.

In reality, the birds' attraction to livestock was likely due to the presence of insects. Chuck-will's-widow forages at dusk and dawn, silently swooping over the ground in search of prey. Specialized feathers known as rictal bristles help funnel insects into the bird's mouth, which is so large that they may occasionally swallow small birds and bats as well!

Read more and hear the "chuck's" song >>

Chuck-will's-widow by Dick Snell/Flickr
 
facebook_blue.jpg twitter-blue.jpg youtube_blue.jpg wordpress_blue.jpg
donate_green.jpg bird_collisions_green.jpg botw_archive_green.jpg subscribe_green.jpg
green_rule.jpg

American Bird Conservancy | P.O. Box 249 | The Plains, VA 20198

Unsubscribe


Friday, June 27, 2014

Very Important Meeting Concerning the Fate of the Ridgewood Reservoir

A letter from Steve Nanz to conservationists and interested parties on Ridgewood Reservoir..
More details can be seen on, http://ridgewoodreservoir.blogspot.com


Steve's letter

By now you may be aware of the upcoming Ridgewood Reservoir community meeting which will be held by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC) and the New York City Department of Parks & Recreation (NYCDPR) to explain the proposed plan to decommission the reservoir. It  will be held this  Monday June 30, 2014, from 7:00 pm – 9:00pm at:

St. Pancras School
6820 Myrtle Avenue
Ridgewood, NY

I will unfortunately be out of town but I encourage as many people as possible to attend that meeting.

About eight years ago the Ridgewood Reservoir, located on the Brooklyn/Queens border, became a battle ground between the NYC Parks Department and a group of environmentalists and concerned citizens in the local community. The Parks Department had initiated a plan to develop parts of the Ridgewood Reservoir as an active sports facility. I first became involved with the issue in 2007 when Jennifer Monson, Artistic Director iLAND, contacted my wife, Heidi Steiner, through the Brooklyn Bird Club, to see if there was interest in conducting a breeding bird survey of the Reservoir. The hope was to dissuade the city from developing the basins as ball fields by demonstrating its environmental significance. Heidi and our friend, Rob Jett, with the help of many other volunteers did in fact conduct the survey and identified 38 potential breeding species of which 20 were confirmed (see Breeding Birds RR 07.doc).  The list includes as confirmed American Woodcock. Those concerned citizens formed the Highland Park/Ridgewood Reservoir Alliance with Heidi as its first president. The current president is Gary Comorau. The Alliance has a website, maintained by Rob Jett, which contains just about everything one would want to know about the Reservoir and its history at:

http://ridgewoodreservoir.blogspot.com/

Additional information can be found at:

http://www.nycgovparks.org/parks/highlandpark/highlights/19651

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ridgewood_Reservoir

I have uploaded many additional documents to my FTP server and they can be accessed at:

ftp://stevenanz.com
user: snguest
p/w: guest

The Parks' development plan was ultimately rejected in 2008 by then New York City Comptroller William C. Thompson, Jr. on the grounds that it might adversely affect both the environment and the surrounding community. Instead, the plan was altered to simply conduct renovations and to fully decommission the reservoir. The renovation phase has happened and the result is in my opinion very good. In fact they are beautiful. However, the Parks Department has now embarked on the decommissioning phase.

According to the Parks Department website (see above link),  the New York City Department of Environmental Protection (DEP, not to be confused with DEC) decommissioned the site in 1990. However, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (DEC), which oversees the state's system of dams, continued to list the Reservoir as a Class "C" or "High Hazard" dam. The Parks Department and DEC claim that for safety compliance reasons, work is required to reclassify the reservoir as a Class "D" or "Negligible or No Hazard" dam.

There are two central issue which I believe need to be addressed. The first is that I and others believe that the current Class "C" designation is in error. We believe that it already qualifies as a Class "D" dam. The second issue is that the construction plan, as it currently stands, will adversely impact a wetland habitat. To be clear, this second point is not a personal belief as may be the first. It is a fact which was determined by multiple experts including those from the Parks Department.

With respect to the first issue, I agree with  Mike Miller, Assemblyman for Distract 38, who in his letter of March 28, 2014, requested Commissioner Martens reconsider DEC's position noting that Parks will as he puts it "...destroy the unique ecology of the site as well as wast $11-million dollars in funding..." Since the basins were drained, no significant amount of water has been impounded. This should be no surprise. The three basins which make up the reservoir were constructed using puddle clay and rocks from the surrounding area. When the reservoir was decommissioned, the pumps were removed and the pipes sealed. The basins were drained and no water can get in except for rain fall directly onto the reservoir as is noted in the Parks' Permit Application (see Ridgewood_Permit.pdf in the Permit Aplication folder). From Wikipedia: "The puddle is laid about 10 inches (25 cm) thick at the sides and nearly 3 ft (0.91 m) thick at the bottom of a canal, built up in layers. Puddle has to be kept wet in order to remain waterproof so it is important for canals to be kept filled with water." An exhaustive description of the process implemented at the Reservoir as well as an OP-ED piece to the NY Times, authored by William C. Thompsan Jr. and Robert F. Kennedy Jr., can be found at:

http://ridgewoodreservoir.blogspot.com/2008_05_01_archive.html

The basin floors and walls are now covered with trees, their roots penetrating severeal feet. They have been through 24 dry seasons since the basins were drained. I suspect that nature has already decommissioned the dam. It would seem likely that the reservoir is a failed dam which no longer materially impounds water and does in fact qualify as a Class "D" dam per DOW TOGS 3.1.5 – GUIDANCE FOR DAM HAZARD CLASSIFICATION (see DAM HAZARD CLASSIFICATION_togs315.pdf) which states:

(4) Class "D" or "Negligible or No Hazard" dam: A dam that has been breached or removed, or has failed or otherwise no longer materially impounds waters, or a dam that was planned but never constructed. Class "D" dams are considered to be defunct dams posing negligible or no hazard. The department may retain pertinent records regarding such dams.

The plans call for placing culverts between basins 1 and 2 (east and central) and between basins 2 and 3 (central and west). Basin 3 will be breached at the south west corner and a road will be constructed from there to the north east end where the converts will be located. According to the Environmental Assessment, water is unlikely to ever flow through the basin 3 breach. The Permit Application concludes that a storm dropping 39.1 inches in 72 hours  would not cause this to happen. That amount of rain exceeds the annual rainfall. The Reservoir is designated Class "C" due to it's potential to impound water. It does not seem to have that ability anymore even if it could be demonstrated that enough rain could fall in order raise the water to hazardous levels were the basins sealed. The Environmental Assessment speculates that water from municipal source could raise the water level but gives no evidence. The reservoir is the highest point in Long Island and the pipes going in are filled with cement.

• With respect to the second issue, I have been told by DEC that at some point in the future it will designate wetlands in the east and central basins but the west basin will never gain that status. When asked why wetland designation does not happen prior to construction, I was told that DEC resources are required for Sandy projects. I pointed out that both a certified wetland delineator (see Mickey Cohen Wetland Report.pdf) and the Parks' own Preliminary Assessment (see Ridgewood Reservoir Draft Assessment.pdf), prepared by Round Mountain Ecological LLC, indicted the existence of a wetland in the west basin as well as the environmental significance of that wetland but was told that it was the opinion of DEC that no wetland of environmental significance existed. After my my conversations with DEC, I received a copy of the recently released Environmental Assessment Statement (see Environmental Assessment.pdf). It confirms the existence of a wetland in the west basin sighting the work of Round Mountain. It should be noted here that the Round Mountain survey identified endangered and threatened plant species in that basin. The EAS also sited the results of its own wetland delineation survey conducted in 2011 by GZA GeoEnvironmental and field visits by ecologists from NRG in 2014 both of which confirmed "characteristics and native wetland species" in portions of basin 3.

Although the EAS admits that wetland habitat will be adversely impacted by the road construction, it makes the claim that it does not matter because the wetland is under 12.4 acres per ECL Article 24 (see ECL ARTICLE 24.pdf) and even if it were over 12.4 acres, DEC may not need to give it protected status. Since the reservoir has not yet been decommissioned according to the DEC, it remains a reservoir and "...Reservoirs are not considered to be jurisdictional wetlands according to the NYSDEC." No reference is given for this and I was unable to find its origin and again, NYCDEP considers the reservoir to be decommissioned. However, the statement seems to conflict with 24-0103. Declaration of policy of the ECL which states:

"It is declared to be the public policy of the state to preserve, protect and conserve freshwater wetlands and the benefits derived therefrom, to prevent the despoliation and destruction of
freshwater wetlands, and to regulate use and development of such wetlands to secure the natural benefits of freshwater wetlands, consistent with the general welfare and beneficial economic, social and agricultural development of the state."

To be clear, DEC is calling this a reservoir because it has not been decommissioned in the sense that it believes that it has the potential to impound water at potentially hazardous levels even though it has not impounded water since it was decommissioned 25 years ago. It therefore is not obligated to protect the wetlands despite the ECL Article 24 Statement of Policy.

Furthermore per ECL Article 2:

Section 24-0301. Commissioner's study.

The commissioner shall, as soon as practicable, conduct a study to identify and map those individual freshwater wetlands in the state of New York which shall have an area of at least twelve and four-tenths acres or more, or if less than twelve and four-tenths, (a) have, in the discretion of the commissioner, and subject to review of his action by the board created pursuant to title eleven of this article, unusual local importance for one or more of the specific benefits set forth in subdivision seven of section 24-0105 or...

Subdivision seven of section 24-0105:

7. Any loss of freshwater wetlands deprives the people of the state of some or all of the many and multiple benefits to be derived from wetlands, to wit:

(a) flood and storm control by the hydrologic absorption and storage capacity of freshwater wetlands;
(b) wildlife habitat by providing breeding, nesting and feeding grounds and cover for many forms of wildlife, wildfowl and shorebirds, including migratory wildfowl and rare species such as the bald eagle and osprey;
(c) protection of subsurface water resources and provision for valuable watersheds and recharging ground water supplies;
(d) recreation by providing areas for hunting, fishing, boating, hiking, bird watching, photography, camping and other uses;
(e) pollution treatment by serving as biologicO and chemical oxidation basins;
(f) erosion control by serving as sedimentation areas and filtering basins, absorbing silt and organic matter and protecting channels and harbors;
(g) education and scientific research by providing readily accessible outdoor bio-physicallaboratories, living classrooms and vast training and education resources; and
(h) open space and aesthetic appreciation by providing often the only remaining open areas along crowded river fronts and coastal Great Lakes regions; and
(i) sources of nutrients in freshwater food cycles and nursery grounds and sanctuaries for freshwater fish.

I see at least three points which apply: b, d, and g. Although under 12.4 acres, this wetland should be protected

In conclusion, whereas I lack the expertise to determine with 100% confidence the dam classification, loss of important wetland, I believe, is inarguable. DEC and Parks seem to be on the path of shoot first and ask questions later. But perhaps all the points I have raised will be addressed in Monday's meeting to the satisfaction of reasonable people. I do not see how that is possible without mapping the actual wetland by an unbiased neutral party, something which I do not believe has been done to date. I would like to be wrong, because the plan calls for the long term environmental rehabilitation of the Reservoir.

Thank for your interested in this matter.

Best Regards,

Steve Nanz
--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Highland Park-Ridgewood Reservoir Alliance" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to ridgewoodreservoir+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
To post to this group, send email to ridgewoodreservoir@googlegroups.com.
Visit this group at http://groups.google.com/group/ridgewoodreservoir.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.


Tuesday, June 24, 2014

Fwd: Prospect Park, today


-----Original Message-----
From: kathleentoomey@
To: Peter Dorosh
Sent: Tue, Jun 24, 2014 4:53 pm
Subject: Prospect Park, today


Prospect Park, Kings, US-NY
Jun 24, 2014 9:15 AM - 1:15 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
30 species

Mute Swan  8     One pair had 5 cygnets, 2 riding on one of the adult's back
Wood Duck  6     Three young ones with their mother
Mallard  23
Ruddy Duck  1     Seen clearly on the Lake, diving for food, ruddy color, white cheek patch
Great Egret  1
Green Heron  3     Two fledglings on branches near their nest
Black-crowned Night-Heron  2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  5
Mourning Dove  5
Chimney Swift  2
Red-bellied Woodpecker  1     Heard
Downy Woodpecker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1     Seen and heard in the Ravine
Eastern Kingbird  1
Warbling Vireo  6
Red-eyed Vireo  1
Blue Jay  1
Barn Swallow  7     Two babies still on the nest
House Wren  3     Heard
Wood Thrush  1     Heard near the nest in the ravine which appeared to be empty
American Robin  31
Gray Catbird  10
European Starling  19
Cedar Waxwing  2
Chipping Sparrow  1
Northern Cardinal  5
Red-winged Blackbird  7
Common Grackle  12
Baltimore Oriole  2
House Sparrow  X

Habitats under siege..Japanese Knotweed

tell me about it :(

http://newyork.cbslocal.com/2014/06/23/experts-warn-of-extremely-invasive-plant-causing-havoc-on-staten-island/

A year in the life of a birder

A witty perspective

http://birdersconundrum.blogspot.com/2014/06/graph-year-in-life-of-birder.html

Monday, June 23, 2014

Fwd: GWC


-----Original Message-----
From: Orrin Tilevitz
To: Peter Dorosh <prosbird@aol.com>
Sent: Mon, Jun 23, 2014 11:03 am
Subject: GWC

Green-Wood this morning, largely by ear (which necessitated subtracting out mockingbird calls):.  Only mild surprise was a common yellowthroat singing in the underbrush on the west side of the Sylvan Water.  Here is the complete list:

Rock dove
Song sparrow
House sparrow
Monk parakeet
Chipping sparrow
Northern mockingbird
Black-crowned night heron (as many as 3)
Northern cardinal
Eastern kingbird
Barn swallow
European starling
Northern flicker (heard)
Eastern wood pewee (heard)
Brown-headed cowbird (heard)
House finch
Tufted titmouse (heard)
Mourning dove
House wren (heard)
Red-bellied woodpecker (heard)
Great blue heron
Common grackle
Gray catbird
Warbling vireo (heard)
Canada goose
Red-winged blackbird (heard)
Chimney swift
Common yellowthroat (heard)

Also, one FOS groundhog

Sunday, June 22, 2014

Fwd: Prospect Park, Brooklyn, Jun 22, 2014

 

 

Sent from my MetroPCS 4G Android device

 

 

 

------ Original Message ------
From: Rafael Guillermo Campos-Ramírez
Date: 6/22/2014 3:21 PM
To: Peter Dorosh;
Subject:  Prospect Park, Brooklyn, Jun 22, 2014

 

Peter:  A slow mid morning in the park.  The big surprise was the Ruddy Duck, 4 of them at the Lake.  Also 1 Chipping Sparrow, at the Vale.


 


Prospect Park, Brooklyn, Kings, US-NY
Jun 22, 2014 8:00 AM - 11:00 AM
Observer: Rafael G Campos
Protocol: Traveling
2.5 kilometer(s)
31 species

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)  3
Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)  4
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  X
Ruddy Duck (Oxyura jamaicensis)  4    all the individuals seen in the SW side of the lake.  One of them a male.
Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)  1
Great Egret (Ardea alba)  1
Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax)  1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) (Columba livia (Domestic type))  1
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)  5
Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica)  5
Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus)  3
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)  2
Eastern Kingbird (Tyrannus tyrannus)  1
Warbling Vireo (Eastern) (Vireo gilvus gilvus)  2
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)  2
Blue Jay (Cyanocitta cristata)  1
American Crow (Corvus brachyrhynchos)  1
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)  4
Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor)  2
House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)  6
Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus)  1
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  9
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)  9
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)  X
Chipping Sparrow (Spizella passerina)  1    seen taking a bath at the Vale.
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  2
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)  6
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)  5
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)  5
Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)  1
House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)  X

Brooklyn is great birding!!!


First full day of summer

Today something to do to celebrate the first full day of summer, on Governors Island (accessed by ferry from South tip of Manhattan near the Staten Island Ferry)

Tern festival and bird walks

http://nycaudubon.org/tern-festival


[ blog colors,: summer foliage,sky,beach sand, lazy looking clouds,goldenrods]

Monday, June 16, 2014

Fwd: Prospect park, today

 

 

Sent from my MetroPCS 4G Android device

 

 

 

------ Original Message ------
From: Kathleen Toomey
Date: 6/16/2014 7:36 PM
To: Peter Dorosh;
Subject: Prospect park, today

 

Prospect Park, Kings, US-NY
Jun 16, 2014 10:00 AM - 3:00 PM
Protocol: Traveling
2.0 mile(s)
33 species

Mute Swan  7     Two adults and five cygnets
Wood Duck  2     One adult and one immature
Mallard  5
Ruddy Duck  1     Clearly seen, diving on the lake, ruddy color with white cheek patch
Green Heron  3     Two babies were on the nest
Black-crowned Night-Heron  1
Red-tailed Hawk  2
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)  5
Mourning Dove  4
Chimney Swift  1
Red-bellied Woodpecker  3
Hairy Woodpecker  1
Northern Flicker  2
Eastern Wood-Pewee  1     Heard, in the Ravine
Eastern Kingbird  1
Warbling Vireo  5
Red-eyed Vireo  2
Blue Jay  2
Barn Swallow  4     Adult feeding three or four babies in a nest
House Wren  4
Carolina Wren  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher  2     Near the nest, but not feeding young in the nest
Wood Thrush  1
American Robin  25
Gray Catbird  10
European Starling  X
Northern Cardinal  5
Indigo Bunting  1     Butterfly Meadow
Red-winged Blackbird  10
Common Grackle  8
Brown-headed Cowbird  1
Baltimore Oriole  7
House Sparrow  X

Budgerigar 1 Probably an escapee, found by Karen O'Hearn in a tree by the     Vanderbilt Playground

Fwd: GWC This Morning

 

 

Sent from my MetroPCS 4G Android device

 

 

 

------ Original Message ------
From: Orrin Tilevitz
Date: 6/16/2014 4:40 PM
To: Peter Dorosh;
Subject: Fw: GWC This Morning

 




Green-Wood Cemetery this morning:

Song sparrow
Mourning dove
European starling
Northern mockingbird
Monk Parakeet
American robin
House finch (many; picture attached)
Chipping sparrow
Cedar waxwing (many)
Northern cardinal
Common grackle
House sparrow
Eastern wood pewee
Red-bellied woodpecker
Northern flicker (Battle Hill)
Gray catbird
Great egret
Great blue heron
Black-crowned night heron
Baltimore oriole (a few heard)
Warbling vireo (a couple heard)
Rock dove
 


Sunday, June 15, 2014

4 BLACK SKIMMERS Prospect Lake arrvd 8:54 tonite

Fwd: Fwd: BirdsEye-Prospect Park-2014-6-15



-

Observer: joshua malbin
2014-06-15 17:35

Prospect Park
Protocol: Traveling
2 Miles
137 Minutes
Observers: 1
All birds reported? Yes
    6    Wood Duck    4 almost full grown chicks plus mom and dad. happy fathers day! 
    5    Mallard     
    1    Great Egret     
    1    Black-crowned Night-Heron     
    1    Red-tailed Hawk     
    4    Laughing Gull     
    1    Herring Gull     
    X    Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon)     
    2    Mourning Dove     
    2    Chimney Swift     
    1    Ruby-throated Hummingbird    heard only in midwood. 
    3    Red-bellied Woodpecker     
    1    Northern Flicker     
    4    Warbling Vireo     
    2    Red-eyed Vireo     
    2    Blue Jay     
    8    Barn Swallow     
    1    Tufted Titmouse     
    1    White-breasted Nuthatch     
    4    House Wren     
    1    Carolina Wren     
    X    American Robin     
    8    Gray Catbird     
    X    European Starling     
    4    Cedar Waxwing     
    1    Yellow Warbler     
    1    Song Sparrow     
    7    Northern Cardinal     
    2    Indigo Bunting    male and female butterfly meadow. 
    X    Red-winged Blackbird     
    9    Common Grackle     
    1    Brown-headed Cowbird     
    1    Orchard Oriole    flew into butterfly meadow and then flew away. Clearly appeared to be chestnut rather than orange and distinctly smaller than a Baltimore, but I was not aware that they bred in the park so I feel more unsure about this than otherwise I might. 
    X    House Sparrow       
This report was created and sent using BirdsEye BirdLog (http://birdseyebirding.com/)

A week for pollinators June 16th-22nd

http://pollinator.org/pollinator_week_2014.htm

Think of the world without pollination ?  yes,plants die off , threatening our very existence

BEES,MOTHS,BUTTERFLIES,BATS,and so on ....even hummingbirds

How you can help for starters:

http://www.nwf.org/How-to-Help/Garden-for-Wildlife/Create-a-Habitat.aspx?campaignid=WH13F1ASWTX&s_subsrc=Web_Sidebar_CWH_GardenSite_Main

Lake evening watch June 14

From 8:12 - 9 pm

Barn Swallows , a number
Northern Rough winged swallow (breeding ?)
Tree Swallow
Mallard
Ruddy Duck -2
Great Egret,perch 3Sisters
Red Tailed Hawk flyover
Chimney Swifts
Wood Duck pair at 3 Sisters
Common Grackle
House Sparrow

Thursday, June 12, 2014

Today is....

The 150th birthday of Frank Chapman, famed ornithologist who started the Christmas Bird Count. The hall of birds in the American Museum of Natural history is named after him , the first curator of that wing.

Hat tip to Mr Chapman

for more on Mr Chapman, thanks to Rick Wright on this history note, read Ricks blog post

http://birdaz.com/blog/2014/06/12/looking-for-chapman/

Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Feral Cat Colony at Plumb Beach

National Park Service has initiated a program to remove the large cat colony at Plumb Beach in Brooklyn

see the photo below.

Feral cats wreak terrible havoc and toll on birds and other small creatures.  Read ABC Birds Conservancy about it (link )

http://www.abcbirds.org/abcprograms/policy/cats/index.html



If you want to , send a personal note of thanks to NPS NRC manager Doug Adamo Doug_adamo@nps.gov

Some interesting links "summer reading"

http://www.jamaicabaylives.com/#!gallery/cnec

http://nationalmothweek.org/

Tuesday, June 10, 2014

In Memoriam: Jean Bourque


 Jean Bourque, birder , naturalist , quiet conservationist and wife of Ron Bourque, passed away last night.

 Jean was an outstanding long time member of the Brooklyn Bird Club , a ranking and active participant in club events since the late 1960's until her retirement a number of years ago.

She was a compassionate humanitarian and kind friend, an inspiration to long time birders everywhere, particularly here in Brooklyn.; oftentimes involved with planting projects, especially in Floyd Bennett Field, where Ron is a vital voice for Floyd Bennett's conservation as well in regional habitats and locales.She was often seen on trips led by Ron in older days as well as a Floyd Bennett Field advocate, and as well an active participant on Christmas Bird Counts and dinners.

My very first Brooklyn Bird Club trip way back in 1977 was to High Tor, led by Ron and Jean Bourque.It was a very memorable and great personal experience to which this day , inspired by that day, led me to the path of presidency and trip leading, inspired by the Bourques.

Jean was a quiet and gentle person, who contributed greatly to the Brooklyn birding community and environment , with a caring and beneficent concern towards all.She was co- editor of the BBC Clapper Rail in the 1970's .

Rest in Peace , Jean. I am glad we met.

Peter Dorosh


"Life has not ended, but merely changed"

-from Mass of Christian Burial

**************************

From the NYS Birding Listserve , post by NYC Audubon


Subject: Jean Bourque
Date: Thu Jun 12 2014 7:34 am
From: hmaas


On behalf of NYC Audubon, I sadly share with all of you the news that Jean Borque, a long-time tireless and dedicated defender of wildlife and its habitat in New York City, has passed away. She was a leading advocate for conservation in the city and was particularly instrumental in the protection of the grasslands at Floyd Bennett Field, in forming the native plant Garden at Marine Park/Garritsen Creek and many other endeavors. Together with her husband Ron, with whom she constituted a formidable team, she is responsible for many of the efforts over the years designed to protect birds and other wildlife in New York City, particularly in Brooklyn.



A long-time supporter of NYC Audubon and our programs, we thank her and are so very apprciative for all the contributions she has made to our organization and, more importantly, to the natural history and the outdoors in New York City.



A person with her commitment, her dynamic nature and her unflagging willingness to go the extra mile on behalf of the birds and other wildlife of this city cannot be replaced. She will be missed.



Harry Maas

President, NYC Audubon
******************************

Rob Jett's Citybirder post

http://citybirder.blogspot.com/2014/06/in-memorium.html


(Note . In the photo , Jean is the last person on the right, looking through binoculars)

Monday, June 9, 2014

Back from Central New Jersey BBC weekend

101 species.... pretty good...


Fwd: birds on a gray day


-----Original Message-----
From: Karenohearn@
To: prosbird
Sent: Mon, Jun 9, 2014 2:24 pm
Subject: birds on a gray day



Hey Peter,
A male Goldfinch, a few Baltimore Orioles, a Yellow Warbler, and 5 Monk Parakeets seemed ultra bright on this gray day in P.P.
Also seen, a female RB Grosbeak at butterfly meadow around 4:30.
best,
karen o

Fwd: Bird Babies

Breeding prospect birds update

-----Original Message-----
From: robsbate@
To: Peter Dorosh
Sent: Mon, Jun 9, 2014 12:19 pm
Subject: Bird Babies


There were 3 Green Heron babies in the Lilly Pond nest on Saturday but the nest was empty on Sunday when I returned for a photo shoot.  An adult came in to the nest but no heads popped up and the adult flew away.  Nothing again today.

On a brighter note

The Blue-gray Gnatcatcher has a big chick.  I thought it might be a cowbird at first but it has definite BG Gnatcatcher markings.

Rob

Saturday, June 7, 2014

Fwd: Prospect Park bird list today

 

 

Sent from my MetroPCS 4G Android device

 

 

 

------ Original Message ------
From: Adam Welz
Date: 6/7/2014 12:40 PM
To: Tom Stephenson;Peter Dorosh;Stanley Greenberg;Steve Nanz;zdanfreed@gmail.com;Keir Randall;
Subject: Prospect Park bird list today

 

Walked across the park this morn. Not very birdy, though lots of peewees about, which I found interesting. One late Redstart, a female near Terrace Bridge.

Cheers

Adam

Prospect Park, Kings, US-NY
Jun 6, 2014 8:20 AM - 10:30 AM
Protocol: Traveling
3.0 kilometer(s)
Comments:     Sunny. From Parkside entrance to Lookout to Pools through Midwood & Vale and out.
35 species

Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)  1
Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)  2     Ambergill
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  2
Double-crested Cormorant (Phalacrocorax auritus)  1
Green Heron (Butorides virescens)  1
Herring Gull (Larus argentatus)  1
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) (Columba livia (Domestic type))  X
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)  2
Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica)  20     approx count
Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus)  2
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)  1
Northern Flicker (Colaptes auratus)  1
Eastern Wood-Pewee (Contopus virens)  4     All heard singing, two of which were seen. One near 'new islands', two on Lookout, one in Midwood.
Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus)  1
Warbling Vireo (Vireo gilvus)  4
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)  3
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)  1
Tufted Titmouse (Baeolophus bicolor)  2
House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)  4
Carolina Wren (Thryothorus ludovicianus)  1
Blue-gray Gnatcatcher (Polioptila caerulea)  3     pair feeding 3 young at nest near Terrace Bridge, another adult seen later
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  X
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)  4
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)  X
Cedar Waxwing (Bombycilla cedrorum)  15     conservative estimate. Near new islands.
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas)  1     singing
American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla)  1
Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia)  4     singing
Song Sparrow (Melospiza melodia)  1
Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)  5
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)  4
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)  6
Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)  1
Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula)  2
House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)  X

View this checklist online at 
http://ebird.org/ebird/view/checklist?subID=S18716454

Thursday, June 5, 2014

Fwd: prospect park

 

 

Sent from my MetroPCS 4G Android device

 

 

 

------ Original Message ------
From: Orrin Tilevitz
Date: 6/5/2014 9:58 PM
To: Peter Dorosh;
Subject: prospect park

 

This afternoon my wife and I heard a yellow warbler near the pools, somewhere to the left of the dog beach and a blackpoll warbler near Three Sisters Island.

West Brooklyn PERE

From EBird Yahoo

Message

1 Brooklyn Peregrine Update Wed Jun 4, 2014 2:23 pm (PDT) . Posted by:"Matthew Wills"

I learned today from a building owner that the BBC was on his roof filming THREE young Peregrines in their Atlantic Avenue scrape for a documentary to be released in 2016. I've still only seen, and now heard, two from the street.

Some pics up on the blog: http://matthewwills.com/2014/06/04/falcons/

Matthew

Brooklyn Bird Club is 105

Today is the 105th birthday of the Brooklyn Bird Club, founded 1909




BBC Evening program tonight

A reminder : on tonights talk on Tanzania ,presented by Janet Zinn 630 pm.Litchfield Villa

http://www.brooklynbirdclub.org/meetings.htm


Wednesday, June 4, 2014

Ridgewood Reservoir, in the News

Plan to cut culverts in historic Ridgewood Reservoir
has local activists fearful it will lead to development
of the natural oasis
Parks Department says it is mandated to do the work to stave off flooding
and that it will cause minimal damage to the area. But local activists don't
trust city and state officials to safeguard the defunct reservoir which has
turned into natural preserve.
BY LISA L. COLANGELO



NEW YORK DAILY NEWS



Wednesday, June 4, 2014, 2:00 AM

The defunct Ridgewood Reservoir at Highland Park is a natural oasis on the Queens-Brooklyn border. Some local activists are worried that a state-mandated plan to dig out culverts in the reservoir will destroy the natural beauty of the area. Parks officials said it is necessary to stave off flooding but some activists disagree.

DANIEL AVILA/NYC PARKS DEPARTMENT/ PHOTO BY D

The defunct Ridgewood Reservoir at Highland Park is a natural oasis on the Queens-Brooklyn border.

Some local activists are worried that a state-mandated plan to dig out culverts in the reservoir will destroy

the natural beauty of the area. Parks officials said it is necessary to stave off flooding but some activists disagree.



Local activists are fuming over a city plan to cut culverts into the historic Ridgewood Reservoir in order to stave off the
threat of future flooding.

They say the $6 million plan — currently awaiting state environmental approvals — is unnecessary and wasteful of money.

“It would have to rain 24 hours a day for months to reach capacity,” said Geoffrey Croft of New York City Park Advocates.

Critics also worry the project will disturb the ecosystems in the defunct reservoir.

“Construction will destroy the natural habitats within the basins, not to mention that it is also a colossal waste of taxpayer money,”
said local civic activist Christina Wilkinson said. “Furthermore, if this weather event actually were to occur, allowing the basins to drain into a
small catch basin on Vermont Place would be pointless as the sewer system would already be overflowing.”

But the Parks Department said it will face fines by the state if the work is not done, since the reservoir is considered a flooding hazard.

Exported.;

Back in 2004, Mayor Bloomberg announced the defunct Ridgewood Reservoir would be transferred

from the city Department of Environmental Protection to the city Parks Department. A plan to develop

the site never materialized and local activists want to keep the area a wild sanctuary.


The only other solution that would satisfy the state — which would involve extensive tree removal and ongoing
maintenance — is more costly and intrusive, parks officials said.

The reservoir, located on the Brooklyn-Queens border, was built in 1858. It supplied water to Brooklyn until 1959.

Former Mayor Bloomberg announced 10 years ago that the site would be transferred from the city Department of
Environmental Protection to the Parks Department as parkland.

The Bloomberg Administration originally pegged the reservoir and surrounding Highland Park for renovations.

But the $50 million proposal to clear out 20 acres for ballfields and develop the area for recreation died for lack of funds.

The Ridgewood Reservoir is home to birds and other wildlife. Some local activists are worried about a plan that will dig culverts into the reservoir in order to hold off potential flooding. They say its unnecessary but the state is requiring the Parks Department to do the work.

MAISEL, TODD,, NY DAILY NEWS

The Ridgewood Reservoir is home to birds and other wildlife. Some local activists are worried about a
plan that will dig culverts into the reservoir in order to hold off potential flooding. They say it’s unnecessary
but the state is requiring the Parks Department to do the work.



The city did complete a smaller project to repair pathways and lighting around the reservoir, and make the areas more handicapped accessible.

Agency officials said the flood prevention project would not change the condition of the reservoir or reduce public access.

But concerned citizens worried that the culverts could pave the way for future development.

“It is my firm belief that (the Parks Department) crying crocodile tears when they say that they’d rather not breach the basins but are being forced
to by the DEC,” said Rob Jett, who founded the Save the Ridgewood Reservoir website.

He and others worry that the city will revive old plans to clear parts of the reservoir to build the ballfields.

lcolangelo@nydailynews.com
--
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Highland Park-Ridgewood Reservoir Alliance" group.
To unsubscribe from this group and stop receiving emails from it, send an email to ridgewoodreservoir+unsubscribe@googlegroups.com.
To post to this group, send email to ridgewoodreservoir@googlegroups.com.
Visit this group at http://groups.google.com/group/ridgewoodreservoir.
For more options, visit https://groups.google.com/d/optout.

Tuesday, June 3, 2014

Skimmers continue their show

2 BLACK SKIMMERS appeared tonite at Prospect Lake, the first appearing at 8:27 till i left around 8:45. Karen O'Hearn also was a spectator. These very graceful flying birds are a wonder to watch ,how they smoothly glide along, their odd beaks amazingly catching whatever the heck it is.

Looks like they will be back,maybe telling their buddies theres a clambake here at the lake.Hope some of you will try for the skimmer show..

-kb
2 Black Skimmers tonite Prospect Lake

Bklyn peregrine s

NYC Peregrines

Mon Jun 2, 2014 5:33 pm (PDT) .

Posted by:

"Matthew Wills"

 

News from the two Peregrine

scrapes I keep a lens or two on:

 

1. The 55 Water Street scrape,

as you probably know, has four

young Peregrines. The nest

cam is at http://www.55water.com/falcons/live.php

 

2. The Brooklyn House of

Detention scrape has at least

two young Peregrines in it. We

saw them poking their heads

out of the chick-safe grating

(by default) yesterday, looking

down, up, and all around.

These birds are much further

along, feathering-in, though

with some down still visible.

 

(Was heading to a play last

night and didn't have my

camera.)

 

Matthew

Backyard & Beyond

http://matthewwills.com

 

Sent from my MetroPCS 4G Android device

Monday, June 2, 2014

Black Skimmers return

Donna Evans reported 4 BLACK SKIMMERS patrolling Prospect Lake tonight, precisely at 8:45 pm.

Fwd: Prospect Park, Brooklyn, Jun 2, 2014


-----Original Message-----
From: ticornis@
To: Peter Dorosh
Sent: Mon, Jun 2, 2014 1:07 pm
Subject: Prospect Park, Brooklyn, Jun 2, 2014


Peter:  June 2nd, was probably the last day for migration.  I saw only 3 sps of warblers, 2 of them probably breeding in the park (COYE & YEWA), the 3rd one, AMRE, was on its way north.  An unidentified Cuckoo flew over the cove, Lullwater. But there is always hope that a rarity visits the park in the next days.


From RafĂ el

Prospect Park, Brooklyn, Kings, US-NY
Jun 2, 2014 7:30 AM - 11:00 AM
Protocol: Traveling
2.5 kilometer(s)
35 species (+1 other taxa)

Canada Goose (Branta canadensis)  10
Mute Swan (Cygnus olor)  2
Wood Duck (Aix sponsa)  2    pair, Upper Pool.
Mallard (Anas platyrhynchos)  X
Great Egret (Ardea alba)  1    Lower Lullwater
Green Heron (Butorides virescens)  1    Lower Lullwater
Black-crowned Night-Heron (Nycticorax nycticorax)  4    All along the Lullwater
Red-tailed Hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)  1    near Music Pagoda, chased away by RWBL & COGR.
Spotted Sandpiper (Actitis macularius)  1    near the peninsula tip
Laughing Gull (Leucophaeus atricilla)  1    Lake
Rock Pigeon (Feral Pigeon) (Columba livia (Domestic type))  X
Mourning Dove (Zenaida macroura)  5
Coccyzus sp. (Coccyzus sp.)  1    one individual flew over the cove (Lullwater), could be either sps of Coccyzus
Chimney Swift (Chaetura pelagica)  6
Red-bellied Woodpecker (Melanerpes carolinus)  2
Downy Woodpecker (Picoides pubescens)  1
Great Crested Flycatcher (Myiarchus crinitus)  1    Lullwater
Warbling Vireo (Eastern) (Vireo gilvus gilvus)  2
Red-eyed Vireo (Vireo olivaceus)  5
Tree Swallow (Tachycineta bicolor)  1
Barn Swallow (Hirundo rustica)  6
House Wren (Troglodytes aedon)  2
Swainson's Thrush (Catharus ustulatus)  1    near the Upper Pool
Wood Thrush (Hylocichla mustelina)  1
American Robin (Turdus migratorius)  20
Gray Catbird (Dumetella carolinensis)  4
European Starling (Sturnus vulgaris)  X
Common Yellowthroat (Geothlypis trichas)  1    Midwood, female
American Redstart (Setophaga ruticilla)  1    Lullwater, near the cove
Yellow Warbler (Setophaga petechia)  2

Northern Cardinal (Cardinalis cardinalis)  2
Red-winged Blackbird (Agelaius phoeniceus)  3
Common Grackle (Quiscalus quiscula)  3
Brown-headed Cowbird (Molothrus ater)  3    all males, Lookout Hill
Baltimore Oriole (Icterus galbula)  2
House Sparrow (Passer domesticus)  X

Brooklyn is great birding!!!


Sunday, June 1, 2014

Coney Island shoreline hurricane mitigation hearing

https://groups.google.com/forum/m/#!topic/jamaica-bay/WxMgPhJg8zo

OR

http://content.govdelivery.com/accounts/NYSDEC/bulletins/bb02a5

Might mean wetland marsh restoration for Coney Island Creek (more shorebirds. For example).


http://www.brooklyndaily.com/stories/2013/25/bn_coneycreekmarsh_2013_06_21_bk.html


( don't forget,Governor Coumo is the real force behind his  hurricane mitigation agenda)

-kb

Black Skimmers on Prospect Lake

Karen O'Hearn reports her dog walker friend seeing 2 BLACK SKIMMERS on Prospect Lake 9 PM two nights ago (May 30th).

A heads up for anyone willing to venture out in the evening for these graceful birds.


Alder FC

Alder Flycatcher heard only Peninsula per Dale Dyer